Knowledge Center Videos

Search and watch hundreds of videos that include interviews with Midmarket CEOs and experts from around the world - topical videos discussing a wide range of issues important to midsize manufacturers, family-owned businesses, turnaround companies, businesses for sale, exporters and more. Our growing video library also includes: Op-eds on many issues of concern to midsize businesses, how-to videos on a variety of business subjects and expert tips for sales, marketing, human resources, capital funding and executive leadership.

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<p>Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.</p>
 

Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.


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<p>The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.</p>
 

The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.


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<p>Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it&rsquo;s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.</p>
 

Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it’s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.


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<p>A majority of mid-size companies have a very weak second-tier leadership, says Buckley Brinkman, Executive Director of the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership. Many companies get to the brink of collapse before that leader will finally loosen their grip enough to let any kind of change happen. Brinkman says it&rsquo;s very important for that leader to be able to take half a step backwards and allow people to fail.</p>

A majority of mid-size companies have a very weak second-tier leadership, says Buckley Brinkman, Executive Director of the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership. Many companies get to the brink of collapse before that leader will finally loosen their grip enough to let any kind of change happen. Brinkman says it’s very important for that leader to be able to take half a step backwards and allow people to fail.

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<p>A prominent Midmarket CEO discusses best practices for ensuring the long-term profitability, and sustainability of a midmarket family-owned firm.</p>

A prominent Midmarket CEO discusses best practices for ensuring the long-term profitability, and sustainability of a midmarket family-owned firm.

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<p>Financial reform will hurt midsize companies, but the fight isn&permil;&Ucirc;&ordf;t over. Here&permil;&Ucirc;&ordf;s what midmarket executives need to know now about the new law.</p>

Financial reform will hurt midsize companies, but the fight isn‰Ûªt over. Here‰Ûªs what midmarket executives need to know now about the new law.

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<p>Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it&rsquo;s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.</p>

Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it’s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.

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<p>There&rsquo;s no place for complacency among midmarket firms, says economist Don Walls. Executives who are comfortable are vulnerable to being blindsided by changes in a volatile economy. Firms that make no changes to what they are doing over a long period, Walls says, are the ones he worries most about. It&rsquo;s dynamics that creates success, he explains.</p>

There’s no place for complacency among midmarket firms, says economist Don Walls. Executives who are comfortable are vulnerable to being blindsided by changes in a volatile economy. Firms that make no changes to what they are doing over a long period, Walls says, are the ones he worries most about. It’s dynamics that creates success, he explains.

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<p>Most of the nation&rsquo;s productivity gains come from the midmarket, not the larger or smaller firms, says economist Don Walls. The increase in merge &amp; acquisition activity over the last five years also attests to the strength of the midmarket, he adds. But midmarket firms are nonetheless in dire need of better information about their markets and how to develop them, he says, as well as better support from public policies and the government.</p>

Most of the nation’s productivity gains come from the midmarket, not the larger or smaller firms, says economist Don Walls. The increase in merge & acquisition activity over the last five years also attests to the strength of the midmarket, he adds. But midmarket firms are nonetheless in dire need of better information about their markets and how to develop them, he says, as well as better support from public policies and the government.

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