Knowledge Center Videos

Search and watch hundreds of videos that include interviews with Midmarket CEOs and experts from around the world - topical videos discussing a wide range of issues important to midsize manufacturers, family-owned businesses, turnaround companies, businesses for sale, exporters and more. Our growing video library also includes: Op-eds on many issues of concern to midsize businesses, how-to videos on a variety of business subjects and expert tips for sales, marketing, human resources, capital funding and executive leadership.

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<p>Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.</p>
 

Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.


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<p>The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.</p>
 

The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.


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<p>Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it&rsquo;s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.</p>
 

Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it’s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.


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<p>We need to create jobs in new sectors, says economist Don Walls, and that&rsquo;s where the midmarket is so important. He notes that even during the downturn, when the overall ratio of sales per employee has been stagnant, in the midmarket, it has increased spectacularly by 15% to 20% per year. Yet midmarket companies, which have the least likelihood of failure, get the least attention from government. Public policy is skewed, Walls says, because there is little awareness of the importance of the midmarket.</p>

We need to create jobs in new sectors, says economist Don Walls, and that’s where the midmarket is so important. He notes that even during the downturn, when the overall ratio of sales per employee has been stagnant, in the midmarket, it has increased spectacularly by 15% to 20% per year. Yet midmarket companies, which have the least likelihood of failure, get the least attention from government. Public policy is skewed, Walls says, because there is little awareness of the importance of the midmarket.

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<p>Manufacturers that develop ancillary services are by far the most successful, observes economist Don Walls. Those that take their expertise and turn it toward helping others produce or export their technology to other countries tend to gain the greatest added value, he insists.</p>

Manufacturers that develop ancillary services are by far the most successful, observes economist Don Walls. Those that take their expertise and turn it toward helping others produce or export their technology to other countries tend to gain the greatest added value, he insists.

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<p>The trade deficit is America&rsquo;s true growth leader, asserts Alan Tonelson, CEO and Research Fellow at the U.S. Business &amp; Industry Council. And the trade deficit will continue to increase unless there is substantial and wide-reaching reform of U.S. Industrial policy. Here he lays out a plan of action for reform.</p>

The trade deficit is America’s true growth leader, asserts Alan Tonelson, CEO and Research Fellow at the U.S. Business & Industry Council. And the trade deficit will continue to increase unless there is substantial and wide-reaching reform of U.S. Industrial policy. Here he lays out a plan of action for reform.

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<p>The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.</p>

The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.

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<p>Jobs are created in the unlikeliest of places, says economist Don Walls. He says depressed areas, such as Youngstown, Ohio, may be a better place to start a business than in a booming area. The key is to look at the underlying dynamics of an area to determine what type of businesses may be successful there.</p>

Jobs are created in the unlikeliest of places, says economist Don Walls. He says depressed areas, such as Youngstown, Ohio, may be a better place to start a business than in a booming area. The key is to look at the underlying dynamics of an area to determine what type of businesses may be successful there.

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<p>Many small businesses are actually short-term oases for unemployed people, says noted economist Don Walls. One person firms tend to fail faster, he adds, but the longer they stay in business, the more they tend to grow and start hiring.</p>

Many small businesses are actually short-term oases for unemployed people, says noted economist Don Walls. One person firms tend to fail faster, he adds, but the longer they stay in business, the more they tend to grow and start hiring.

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