Knowledge Center Videos

Search and watch hundreds of videos that include interviews with Midmarket CEOs and experts from around the world - topical videos discussing a wide range of issues important to midsize manufacturers, family-owned businesses, turnaround companies, businesses for sale, exporters and more. Our growing video library also includes: Op-eds on many issues of concern to midsize businesses, how-to videos on a variety of business subjects and expert tips for sales, marketing, human resources, capital funding and executive leadership.

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<p>Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.</p>
 

Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.


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<p>The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.</p>
 

The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.


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<p>Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it&rsquo;s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.</p>
 

Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it’s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.


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<p>There are three keys to fending off both foreign and domestic competitors, according to Keith Campbell, Chairman, Mannington Mills in Salem, New Jersey. Here, he identifies each one and explains how he applies it to his family business.</p>

There are three keys to fending off both foreign and domestic competitors, according to Keith Campbell, Chairman, Mannington Mills in Salem, New Jersey. Here, he identifies each one and explains how he applies it to his family business.

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<p>Wisconsin&rsquo;s Economic Development Corporation, is reshaping commerce for economic development of Wisconsin from the inside out, says CEO Michael Klonsinski. This involves initiatives like identifying key industries and then putting dollars and resources to move those forward. Another EDC objective is to create a climate in the state of Wisconsin that allows those businesses to succeed by providing training and support for entrepreneurs and talent development in the state of Wisconsin to help drive these key industries forward. And a third initiative revolves around accelerating support into new markets.</p>

Wisconsin’s Economic Development Corporation, is reshaping commerce for economic development of Wisconsin from the inside out, says CEO Michael Klonsinski. This involves initiatives like identifying key industries and then putting dollars and resources to move those forward. Another EDC objective is to create a climate in the state of Wisconsin that allows those businesses to succeed by providing training and support for entrepreneurs and talent development in the state of Wisconsin to help drive these key industries forward. And a third initiative revolves around accelerating support into new markets.

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<p>Manufacturers that see themselves as experts in the production of a widget are far less successful these days than the manufacturing leader who is packaging services along with the product, according to Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation CEO, Michael Klonsinski. The most successful manufacturers are identifying new markets and new product opportunities by providing different customer services to go with the product. He says the product becomes in many cases an entry point or a credibility builder from which the manufacturer can couple many other profitable services.</p>

Manufacturers that see themselves as experts in the production of a widget are far less successful these days than the manufacturing leader who is packaging services along with the product, according to Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation CEO, Michael Klonsinski. The most successful manufacturers are identifying new markets and new product opportunities by providing different customer services to go with the product. He says the product becomes in many cases an entry point or a credibility builder from which the manufacturer can couple many other profitable services.

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<p>Midmarket firms haven&rsquo;t typically received much attention from the public sector in the past, admits Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation CEO, Michael Klonsinski. He says Wisconsin is among the first states to reach out this important segment. They are nimble enough to be able to move quickly and they have the opportunity to make a significant impact on direct employment when they grow. He says the EDC is targeting midsize companies with exporting assistance, for example, because more of them have &ldquo;been there done that&rdquo; more so than the small companies that may be sticking their toes in the international waters for the first time.</p>

Midmarket firms haven’t typically received much attention from the public sector in the past, admits Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation CEO, Michael Klonsinski. He says Wisconsin is among the first states to reach out this important segment. They are nimble enough to be able to move quickly and they have the opportunity to make a significant impact on direct employment when they grow. He says the EDC is targeting midsize companies with exporting assistance, for example, because more of them have “been there done that” more so than the small companies that may be sticking their toes in the international waters for the first time.

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<p>Wisconsin Manufacturers go from having thought about exporting and thinking, &ldquo;maybe I want to do it,&rdquo; to a fully vetted executable plan for exporting in just 90 days by following the regimen developed by the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership, according to Executive Director Buckley Brinkman.</p>

Wisconsin Manufacturers go from having thought about exporting and thinking, “maybe I want to do it,” to a fully vetted executable plan for exporting in just 90 days by following the regimen developed by the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership, according to Executive Director Buckley Brinkman.

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<p>There&rsquo;s a cultural difficulty between private equity groups and family businesses, observes Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco. A lot of private equity groups want to invest in family businesses. The private capital firm usually wants as a condition of the deal to have the family members leave the business. But the family wants to be in management, and doesn&rsquo;t want to share control. This conflict makes it hard to get deals done.</p>

There’s a cultural difficulty between private equity groups and family businesses, observes Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco. A lot of private equity groups want to invest in family businesses. The private capital firm usually wants as a condition of the deal to have the family members leave the business. But the family wants to be in management, and doesn’t want to share control. This conflict makes it hard to get deals done.

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