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Search and watch hundreds of videos that include interviews with Midmarket CEOs and experts from around the world - topical videos discussing a wide range of issues important to midsize manufacturers, family-owned businesses, turnaround companies, businesses for sale, exporters and more. Our growing video library also includes: Op-eds on many issues of concern to midsize businesses, how-to videos on a variety of business subjects and expert tips for sales, marketing, human resources, capital funding and executive leadership.

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<p>Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.</p>
 

Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.


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<p>The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.</p>
 

The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.


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<p>Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it&rsquo;s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.</p>
 

Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it’s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.


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<p>Many family businesses have extraordinary records of competing against much larger firms, says Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco. He reviews here the many effective weapons that family businesses use to succeed in competition with the big boys.</p>

Many family businesses have extraordinary records of competing against much larger firms, says Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco. He reviews here the many effective weapons that family businesses use to succeed in competition with the big boys.

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<p>Every firm, not just family businesses, cannot be local any more. Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco reports on the Family Business Network Global Summit in Singapore where all of the companies were talking about going global. From whatever country they are in, Jaffe says, family businesses have to look at the markets and they have to look at the customers, and they have to look at everything from a global perspective.</p>

Every firm, not just family businesses, cannot be local any more. Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco reports on the Family Business Network Global Summit in Singapore where all of the companies were talking about going global. From whatever country they are in, Jaffe says, family businesses have to look at the markets and they have to look at the customers, and they have to look at everything from a global perspective.

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<p>As a family business, Mannington Mills is somewhat unique, says Chairman Keith Campbell. The family is in its fourth generation in the company, Yet, he adds, there are only 21 shareholders. In most family businesses, by the time you get the fourth generation, you need a jumbo jet to assemble all the stockholders. Even more unusual was the step taken by his father to set up a voting trust in such a way that Mr. Campbell votes 86% of the voting shares of the company. The company is run more like an &ldquo;un-family business,&rdquo; he says.</p>

As a family business, Mannington Mills is somewhat unique, says Chairman Keith Campbell. The family is in its fourth generation in the company, Yet, he adds, there are only 21 shareholders. In most family businesses, by the time you get the fourth generation, you need a jumbo jet to assemble all the stockholders. Even more unusual was the step taken by his father to set up a voting trust in such a way that Mr. Campbell votes 86% of the voting shares of the company. The company is run more like an “un-family business,” he says.

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<p>In a family-owned business, one of the disciplines that you have to have is to think generation to generation, says Keith Campbell, Chairman of Mannington Mills in Salem, NJ. One of things in the family-owned business, he observes, is there is no cookie cutter approach to anything. When it comes to strategic planning, you have to take a look at your particular situation and understand why are you in this. At the end of the day, he adds, if all that you do is count your money, you have a pretty sad life.</p>

In a family-owned business, one of the disciplines that you have to have is to think generation to generation, says Keith Campbell, Chairman of Mannington Mills in Salem, NJ. One of things in the family-owned business, he observes, is there is no cookie cutter approach to anything. When it comes to strategic planning, you have to take a look at your particular situation and understand why are you in this. At the end of the day, he adds, if all that you do is count your money, you have a pretty sad life.

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<p>The definition of stakeholder in a publicly run company is rather singular with the emphasis on the shareholder as the single most important stakeholder, as opposed to in a family-run business, says Professor Greg McCann. Where if you and I live in the same community, he explains I can lay you off from my family business but then tomorrow I have to see you at the grocery store. The family business is much more tied at the hip with the local community.</p>

The definition of stakeholder in a publicly run company is rather singular with the emphasis on the shareholder as the single most important stakeholder, as opposed to in a family-run business, says Professor Greg McCann. Where if you and I live in the same community, he explains I can lay you off from my family business but then tomorrow I have to see you at the grocery store. The family business is much more tied at the hip with the local community.

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<p>There is this notion in business schools that if you&rsquo;re not growing, you&rsquo;re dead. But nature doesn&rsquo;t work that way, and families don&rsquo;t work that way, according to Professor Greg McCann. Business schools describe a business as successful if it&rsquo;s growing. But McCann says we&rsquo;re seeing the limit to this lifeboat of a planet that we live on.</p>

There is this notion in business schools that if you’re not growing, you’re dead. But nature doesn’t work that way, and families don’t work that way, according to Professor Greg McCann. Business schools describe a business as successful if it’s growing. But McCann says we’re seeing the limit to this lifeboat of a planet that we live on.

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