Knowledge Center Videos

Search and watch hundreds of videos that include interviews with Midmarket CEOs and experts from around the world - topical videos discussing a wide range of issues important to midsize manufacturers, family-owned businesses, turnaround companies, businesses for sale, exporters and more. Our growing video library also includes: Op-eds on many issues of concern to midsize businesses, how-to videos on a variety of business subjects and expert tips for sales, marketing, human resources, capital funding and executive leadership.

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<p>Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.</p>
 

Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.


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<p>The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.</p>
 

The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.


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<p>Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it&rsquo;s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.</p>
 

Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it’s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.


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<p>Prof. Greg McCann tells the story when a student comes to class and says with astonishment, &ldquo;I saw a family business today&rdquo; like they are some rare creature. There&rsquo;s always been this invisibility about the family enterprise, he says, which he attributes to American culture, where everybody wants to be an entrepreneur. McCann beieves we haven&rsquo;t learned the same sophistication on the family side that a lot of other cultures have.</p>

Prof. Greg McCann tells the story when a student comes to class and says with astonishment, “I saw a family business today” like they are some rare creature. There’s always been this invisibility about the family enterprise, he says, which he attributes to American culture, where everybody wants to be an entrepreneur. McCann beieves we haven’t learned the same sophistication on the family side that a lot of other cultures have.

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<p>Before 1981 all that you could find out in the literature about family business was one article in Harvard Business Review where they wrote about when family members work in the business, it&rsquo;s bad and there&rsquo;s rivalry and jealousy and all those kind of things. It was a source of embarrassment rather than pride for people, observes Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco. He is also the author of two books on family businesses, &ldquo;Stewardship in Your Family Enterprise&rdquo;and &ldquo;Working with the Ones You Love&rdquo;. We tend to think of family businesses as kind of lesser businesses, Jaffe says. Yet, the fact is about the third of the Fortune 500 and the largest businesses, many public corporations and a majority of small and medium businesses are family owned/run businesses.</p>

Before 1981 all that you could find out in the literature about family business was one article in Harvard Business Review where they wrote about when family members work in the business, it’s bad and there’s rivalry and jealousy and all those kind of things. It was a source of embarrassment rather than pride for people, observes Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco. He is also the author of two books on family businesses, “Stewardship in Your Family Enterprise”and “Working with the Ones You Love”. We tend to think of family businesses as kind of lesser businesses, Jaffe says. Yet, the fact is about the third of the Fortune 500 and the largest businesses, many public corporations and a majority of small and medium businesses are family owned/run businesses.

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<p>Since the family name is often on the business, they have a sense of pride and they want to treat their employs well, says Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco. They don&rsquo;t want to have all the people in the community who are employed in the business going and saying: &ldquo;We hate these people.&rdquo; So, they see their employees as being stakeholders. And they tend to have a long-term view. They&rsquo;re not investing for a quick profit, they&rsquo;re looking to the future and particularly when they want the next generation to be involved. That means they have a 50 or a 100-year view.</p>

Since the family name is often on the business, they have a sense of pride and they want to treat their employs well, says Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco. They don’t want to have all the people in the community who are employed in the business going and saying: “We hate these people.” So, they see their employees as being stakeholders. And they tend to have a long-term view. They’re not investing for a quick profit, they’re looking to the future and particularly when they want the next generation to be involved. That means they have a 50 or a 100-year view.

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<p>Family businesses have all the problems of a business and added to that is the fact that the people that are in the business have other relationships to each other. The challenge, says Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco, is not to make those things go away, because they&rsquo;re not going to go away. The objective is to do something to make the negative effects go away so that it doesn&rsquo;t hurt the business.</p>

Family businesses have all the problems of a business and added to that is the fact that the people that are in the business have other relationships to each other. The challenge, says Professor Dennis Jaffe of Saybrook University in San Francisco, is not to make those things go away, because they’re not going to go away. The objective is to do something to make the negative effects go away so that it doesn’t hurt the business.

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<p>Jack Stack, Founder &amp; CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, explains the importance and mechanics of teaching employees basic financial and business literacy. The fundamental dynamics of business are poorly understood, even among college graduates, he says. When employees learn basic financial literacy, their performance and motivation improve dramatically.</p>

Jack Stack, Founder & CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, explains the importance and mechanics of teaching employees basic financial and business literacy. The fundamental dynamics of business are poorly understood, even among college graduates, he says. When employees learn basic financial literacy, their performance and motivation improve dramatically.

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<p>Jack Stack, Founder &amp; CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, describes his experience in teaching basic financial and business literacy to employees of a local theatrical group. When employees learned basic financial literacy, their performance and motivation improved dramatically.</p>

Jack Stack, Founder & CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, describes his experience in teaching basic financial and business literacy to employees of a local theatrical group. When employees learned basic financial literacy, their performance and motivation improved dramatically.

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