Knowledge Center Videos

Search and watch hundreds of videos that include interviews with Midmarket CEOs and experts from around the world - topical videos discussing a wide range of issues important to midsize manufacturers, family-owned businesses, turnaround companies, businesses for sale, exporters and more. Our growing video library also includes: Op-eds on many issues of concern to midsize businesses, how-to videos on a variety of business subjects and expert tips for sales, marketing, human resources, capital funding and executive leadership.

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<p>Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.</p>
 

Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.


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<p>The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.</p>
 

The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.


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<p>Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it&rsquo;s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.</p>
 

Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it’s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.


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<p>A family business is a strategic asset because there is a strong sense of ownership by the family. The board of directors is not just yes-men, notes Professor Greg McCann, Ph. D., Director and Founder, Family Enterprise Center, Stetson University. He observes that half the employees in this country work for their employers less than five years and a quarter of the people in this country work for their employers less than a year. But many family businesses have two generations of employees that work there. What makes the family business a profound strategic asset, he says, is the triple bottom line of people, profit and planet.</p>

A family business is a strategic asset because there is a strong sense of ownership by the family. The board of directors is not just yes-men, notes Professor Greg McCann, Ph. D., Director and Founder, Family Enterprise Center, Stetson University. He observes that half the employees in this country work for their employers less than five years and a quarter of the people in this country work for their employers less than a year. But many family businesses have two generations of employees that work there. What makes the family business a profound strategic asset, he says, is the triple bottom line of people, profit and planet.

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<p>Employee loyalty in family businesses is very high because they feel connected, they feel cared for, says Professor Greg McCann. There&rsquo;s always stories of the family taking care of employees when they didn&rsquo;t have to but they wanted to. The family business is disproportionally represented in the 100 best companies to work for, he adds. It&rsquo;s because they care about the people.</p>

Employee loyalty in family businesses is very high because they feel connected, they feel cared for, says Professor Greg McCann. There’s always stories of the family taking care of employees when they didn’t have to but they wanted to. The family business is disproportionally represented in the 100 best companies to work for, he adds. It’s because they care about the people.

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<p>One of the risks in family businesses is they get isolated. Employees have been there a long time, upper management has been there as long as the founder, the board doesn&rsquo;t have outside independent directors &ndash; and everyone can get complacent. That lack of true accountability is a big, big risk, says Professor Greg McCann. Here he suggests how family businesses can fight complacency.</p>

One of the risks in family businesses is they get isolated. Employees have been there a long time, upper management has been there as long as the founder, the board doesn’t have outside independent directors – and everyone can get complacent. That lack of true accountability is a big, big risk, says Professor Greg McCann. Here he suggests how family businesses can fight complacency.

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<p>One area of the Dodd-Franks financial reform law that will severely impact the day to day operations of midmarket manufacturers, Quaadman points out, is the use of derivatives. &ldquo;We fought very hard and will continue to fight hard for sensible exemptions for corporate end-users of derivatives,&rdquo; he says, &ldquo;because they use derivatives for what they&#39;re intended to be. And that is as a risk management tool that allows him to bring products to the market with the least amount of price volatility for consumers.&rdquo;</p>

One area of the Dodd-Franks financial reform law that will severely impact the day to day operations of midmarket manufacturers, Quaadman points out, is the use of derivatives. “We fought very hard and will continue to fight hard for sensible exemptions for corporate end-users of derivatives,” he says, “because they use derivatives for what they're intended to be. And that is as a risk management tool that allows him to bring products to the market with the least amount of price volatility for consumers.”

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<p>Midmarket companies in the U.S. tend to reflect the U.S.-centric view of the world of the general population and it&rsquo;s a growing liability as the U.S. economy becomes more global, according to Stephan Richter, editor and publisher of The Globalist Online Magazine. Fortunately, Richter adds, it&rsquo;s a liability that can be easily overcome and huge payoffs await those who succeed. He gives the details in this lively interview.</p>

Midmarket companies in the U.S. tend to reflect the U.S.-centric view of the world of the general population and it’s a growing liability as the U.S. economy becomes more global, according to Stephan Richter, editor and publisher of The Globalist Online Magazine. Fortunately, Richter adds, it’s a liability that can be easily overcome and huge payoffs await those who succeed. He gives the details in this lively interview.

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<p>Jack Stack, Founder &amp; CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, says moving to employee ownership has brought about significant tangible benefits to the business.</p>

Jack Stack, Founder & CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, says moving to employee ownership has brought about significant tangible benefits to the business.

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