Knowledge Center Videos

Search and watch hundreds of videos that include interviews with Midmarket CEOs and experts from around the world - topical videos discussing a wide range of issues important to midsize manufacturers, family-owned businesses, turnaround companies, businesses for sale, exporters and more. Our growing video library also includes: Op-eds on many issues of concern to midsize businesses, how-to videos on a variety of business subjects and expert tips for sales, marketing, human resources, capital funding and executive leadership.

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<p>Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.</p>
 

Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.


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<p>The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.</p>
 

The U.S. Commercial Service is the champion of American companies that they seek to enter foreign markets. It can work with companies to identify what they should be doing, which market they should be entering, says Suresh Kumar, Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Director-General of the U.S. Commercial Service. The goal, he adds, is to influence more American companies to export and those who do export to export to more markets. Here he explains the wide range of services available in every state and in 79 countries around the world.


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<p>Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it&rsquo;s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.</p>
 

Most midmarket companies are regional in character, says economist Don Walls, and naturally better suited to expanding domestically rather than internationally. For many midmarket companies, their competitive strength is in face-to-face relationships. Since acquisition is a classic entry strategy, he adds, it’s much easier to evaluate acquisition candidates in the U.S. than in overseas markets.


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<p>Jack Stack, Founder &amp; CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, discusses the challenges of managing an employee-owned company. One surprising challenge comes from achieving success in the business. Here, he explains why.</p>

Jack Stack, Founder & CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, discusses the challenges of managing an employee-owned company. One surprising challenge comes from achieving success in the business. Here, he explains why.

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<p>Jack Stack, Founder &amp; CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, discusses the wasteful unintended consequences of government regulations on midsize businesses. He reviews the litany of government agencies that intrude on his business and cites specific examples of wasteful extra costs he must incur because of government regulations.</p>

Jack Stack, Founder & CEO of SRC Holdings, a group of companies with over $600 million in annual revenues, discusses the wasteful unintended consequences of government regulations on midsize businesses. He reviews the litany of government agencies that intrude on his business and cites specific examples of wasteful extra costs he must incur because of government regulations.

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<p>With companies rated on their financial strength as A, B or C, the B companies, which include most midmarket firms, could tip either way, and soar like an A company or spiral down and out like a C company. The B companies often do nothing, and that&rsquo;s a big mistake, according to William J. Hass, CTP, Former Chairman of the Turnaround Management Association, and Shepherd G. Pryor IV, Managing Director, Board Resources, a Division of TeamWork Technologies, Inc. They lay out some practical strategic options.</p>

With companies rated on their financial strength as A, B or C, the B companies, which include most midmarket firms, could tip either way, and soar like an A company or spiral down and out like a C company. The B companies often do nothing, and that’s a big mistake, according to William J. Hass, CTP, Former Chairman of the Turnaround Management Association, and Shepherd G. Pryor IV, Managing Director, Board Resources, a Division of TeamWork Technologies, Inc. They lay out some practical strategic options.

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<p>The first thing that helps a midsize company commercialize a monopoly is the lack of public information about the company says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. The moment a midmarket company goes public, everyone knows how much money it makes. Midsize companies must understand why it makes money, how long will it last and is it really exercising its pricing power, by pricing to value. Finally, the company must always be working on finding its next monopoly.</p>

The first thing that helps a midsize company commercialize a monopoly is the lack of public information about the company says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. The moment a midmarket company goes public, everyone knows how much money it makes. Midsize companies must understand why it makes money, how long will it last and is it really exercising its pricing power, by pricing to value. Finally, the company must always be working on finding its next monopoly.

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<p>Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.</p>

Real monopolies are often totally neglected, and the worst example is when a midsize company is showing a loss on a product that is producing high profits without allocations of overheads says Milind Lele, author of Monopoly Rules. Does the customer only see you? Does the competition not see you? Lele cites the example of Sears getting blindsided by Wal-Mart. Sears saw Wal-Mart as a discounter, not as a competitor.

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<p>Mr. Quaadman says the financial reform law will damage the ability of midsize companies to raise capital and to continue to use the futures markets to hedge their exposure to risk in the cost of commodities. The fight isn&rsquo;t over, Mr. Quaadman added, and urged midsized companies to keep tabs on what&#39;s going on in Congress in terms of news but also be in touch with your representatives.</p>

Mr. Quaadman says the financial reform law will damage the ability of midsize companies to raise capital and to continue to use the futures markets to hedge their exposure to risk in the cost of commodities. The fight isn’t over, Mr. Quaadman added, and urged midsized companies to keep tabs on what's going on in Congress in terms of news but also be in touch with your representatives.

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